Thursday, 27 July 2017

TheGenealogist adds directories from 1921

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

TheGenealogist introduces a new census substitute for the year 1921

TheGenealogist has just released a new circa 1921 resource, covering 23 counties, with over one million records. These form part of the Trade, Residential & Telephone record sets on TheGenealogist covering a period currently not served by a census.

The fully transcribed, searchable records released today will allow researchers to:

● search on forename, surname and profession
● search by street, town and county
● look for a business name
● discover your ancestors’ addresses
● find professions listed

These 1921 directories cover the North, South, East and the West of England, the Channel Islands and as far up the country as Aberdeen. If you have ancestors who you are tracing in 1921, this new release from TheGenealogist adds a fantastic name rich resource to your family history research armoury.

Searching for householders within these 23 newly released county directories returns a good number of names from that time, including many that are still famous today. For example, in these new records we can find Harry Gordon Selfridge, founder of Selfridge's department store; Jesse Boot, who was behind the chemist chain that still carries his name; Winnie-the-Pooh’s author A. A. Milne; J.M. Barrie, who created the characters of Peter Pan and Wendy; plus the celebrated economist, John Maynard Keynes. You can read more about finding them in the records in our featured article at: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2017/addressing-where-they-were-in-1921-571/

The areas covered in this release include:
● Aberdeen
● Bath
● Berkshire
● Bradford and Surrounding Districts
● Bristol and Suburberbs
● Brixton and Clapham
● Buckinghamshire
● Cambridgeshire
● Channel Islands
● Cheshire
● Cumberland
● Dorset
● Durham
● Hessle
● Hull
● Lincolnshire
● London
● London County Suburbs
● Middlesbrough
● Norfolk
● Northumberland
● Oxfordshire
● Somerset
● Suffolk
● Westmorland
● Wiltshire
● Worcestershire
● Yorkshire

We will be adding further counties in the coming months.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

RAF and London records join Ancestry

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has released three more major collections, two for London, and one for those with RAF members in their family.

UK, Royal Air Force Airmen Records, 1918-1940
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61400
Source: AIR 79 Royal Air Force Airmen Records, 1918-1940. The National Archives of the UK, Kew, Surrey, England.

This collection comprises records of Airmen serving in the Royal Air Force during the years 1918 up to, and including, 1940.

The Royal Air Force (RAF) was founded in 1918, after the uniting of the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). The records are arranged by service number and include the following details, where available:
  • Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Age
  • Place of Birth
  • Date of Service
  • Service Number
  • Name of Mother
  • Name of Father
  • Name of Spouse

UPDATE: Sadly, you need a subscription to Fold3.com to view the images - I don't get the point of this. If it is not on Ancestry, why advertise that it is? Only the indexes are available on Ancestry. Disappointing.


London, England, School Admissions and Discharges, 1912-1918
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61572
Source: School Admission and Discharge Registers, London Metropolitan Archives, London, England.

This collection comprises School Admission and Discharges in London for the years 1912 to 1918. It contains details of just under 100,000 students from schools across London. In 1833, Parliament started to provide money for the construction of schools for poor children, although it was still largely a private affair. Mandatory schooling was a local decision until 1870, when children were required to attend from age 5 to 10. By 1918, education was required up to the age of 14.

These records are made up of lists of children who were admitted to and discharged from schools. When education was required, children could be discharged from their schooling if they were needed to work to help support the family. The records vary by school and some are more detailed than others. The records include (where available):
  • Admission Date
  • Name
  • Parents’ names
  • Parents’ occupation
  • Address
  • Birth date
  • Age


London, England, Poor Law School District Registers, 1852-1918
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61452
Source: Poor Law School District Registers, London Metropolitan Archives, London, England.

This collection comprises admission and discharges for Poor Law school districts in London for the years 1852 to 1918. It contains details of more than 219,000 students from District schools across London. After 1834, the Poor Law Commission required each union to set up a properly constituted residential school for pauper children with a salaried schoolmaster or schoolmistress. Pauper children were to receive both a basic education and industrial training to make them fit for employment. The 1844 Poor Law Amendment Act and 1848 District Schools Act gave the Poor Law Commissioners powers to combine parishes and unions into school districts which would establish a large residential school outside London for the care and education of all pauper children from the areas concerned. Seven Poor Law School Districts were formed in the metropolitan area.

These records are made up of lists of children who were admitted to and discharged from schools. When education was required, children could be discharged from their schooling if they were needed to work to help support the family. The records vary by school and some are more detailed than others. The records include (where available):
  • Admission Date
  • Discharge Date
  • Name
  • Gender
  • School
  • Address
  • Birth date
  • Age


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Northamptonshire Record Office fees - the archive sector responds

The following statement has been issued by John Chambers, Chief Executive of the Archives and Records Association (UK & Ireland) (www.archives.org.uk), with regards to the shocking developments concerning records access at Northamptonshire Record Office (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/northamptonshire-holds-firm-on-archive.html):

The news of the drastic service reductions at Northamptonshire Record Office in England this week came as a surprise to the Archives and Records Association. In short the county council has reduced the ‘free public access’ element of the service to 12 hours a week (three mornings), proposing to charge over £30 an hour for ‘research support’ outside these hours. Usually we get to hear about threatened cuts and can take some pre-emptive action but on this occasion we were not aware of these proposals. We will now do what we can to challenge the cuts in free public access. The proposed charges are likely to cost more to administer than they ever raise in revenue. There are bound to be questions about the sustainability of the archive service in Northamptonshire, its status as an official Place of Deposit and the county’s ability to retain custody of part of its local heritage over the long term.

We have contacted The National Archives about the Northamptonshire situation. As TNA is the regulator of Places of Deposit in England and Wales, we will urge it to seek to reverse what has happened. We will be contacting both the Leader and Chief Executive of Northamptonshire County Council and others to urge the same.

Separately, members will know that the ARA has been working on the sustainability and resilience of local government record offices for the last year and commissioned a report from Elizabeth Oxborrow-Cowan. The ARA Board considered and approved the report at its annual planning day last month and is developing an action plan based on the recommendations in the report. We will publish the findings after Conference in the autumn. Evidently, the need for us to lead this work going forward has become more urgent than ever.

COMMENT: It seems clear that this move by Northamptonshire County Council is out of step with what the archive sector itself considers best practice.

A reminder that the petition opposing the development is online at https://www.change.org/p/northamptonshire-county-council-northamptonshire-county-council-don-t-charge-for-visiting-archives

(With thanks to Lorraine Logan and John Chambers)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Northamptonshire holds firm on archive fees

Northamptonshire County Council has issued the following statement in response to criticism of its appalling plans to drastically reduce free access to its county archive, and to charge £31.50 an hour for the remainder of the week (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/northamptonshire-council-to-impose.html):

STATEMENT ON NORTHAMPTONSHIRE ARCHIVES AND HERITAGE SERVICE OPENING HOURS

Northamptonshire County Council is responsible for making sure that limited and reducing local government resources are used as effectively as possible. In the current financial climate, it has no option but to look at how best to remodel service delivery with reduced budgets.

The Archives Service changes to opening hours that will be implemented from 21 August show a commitment to maintaining free public access to archives. The service will continue to be free for on-site visitors from 9am to 1pm Tuesday to Thursday and one Saturday morning each month. 

Customers have said that they most need and want online access to resources; numbers visiting the service in person have fallen dramatically in the past two years. This has been taken into account in this revision to opening hours and the intention is that outside the core opening hours, the service’s limited staff resources will be redirected to the work of digitisation and developing on-line access to archives.

In order to mitigate the impact on research of the changes, the service has in fact extended the times during which people can choose to visit.

These additional hours are chargeable but are offered in order to support researchers and not otherwise.

This is a bold step in difficult times and we seek your support as we work to ensure that researchers can enjoy and learn from our rich collections now and into the future.


COMMENT: This is quite classically a response looking at the accounts and not the point of the service. It is an appalling assault on the right to free access to the county's heritage, already paid for by local taxation. Will they be charging for access to their libraries next? What alternatives were considered? Where was the consultation?

If this plan continues, it may well incentivise other archives to do the same, and utterly devastate the provision for both genealogical and academic research. A petition opposing the plans and calling for a rethink has been set up by Dr. Mary Ann Lund from the University of Leicester. If you do one thing today, please seriously consider signing the petition - it is available at https://www.change.org/p/northamptonshire-county-council-northamptonshire-county-council-don-t-charge-for-visiting-archives.

Here is just one of many comments on the petition:

Archives should be for all. As a specialist curator for the National Trust and as Chairman of the Furniture History Society, both charities, charging scholars and ratepayers for access to historic documents seems a retrograde step, which, if implemented, would set a regrettable precedent. It would go against the wishes of donors and depositors of archives (the National Trust is a major depositor of archives across the country) betraying the natural assumption that access to historic documents would be available to all without charge. Charging over £30 an hour would deter many scholars and younger researchers. It will tarnish the reputation of Northampton.

This really has got the makings of a devastating development for our sector, whether for amateurs or professionals requiring access to archive records. Please sign.

(With thanks to Wendy Archer via email)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Wednesday, 26 July 2017

AncestryDNA 25% kit discount offer

AncestryDNA is offering a 25% discount on all new DNA testing kits before August 3rd 2017.



(Also at https://youtu.be/ns8gOcOQ9Go)

For further details visit https://www.ancestry.co.uk/dna/

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Northamptonshire Council to impose outrageous archive charges

There has been what can only be described as a fairly outrageous development in England this week with regard to access to archives, in that Northamptonshire County Council has decided to restrict free access to its archives collections from August 21st to Tuesday-Thursday monrings, and a handful Saturdays throughout the year - and to impose a whopping sized charge of £31.50 per hour for access at other times.

Here is the announcement from the archive's Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/NorthamptonshireArchives/:

Important Information: From 21 August 2017, opening times for free access to the Archives Service will be as follows:

• Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday: 9am to 1pm
• First Saturday of the month only, April - October: 9am to 4pm

The times during which researchers can visit the Archives Service are being increased. Appointments can now be booked, in advance and for a fee, to view original documents during the following times. The current fee is £31.50 per hour.

• Monday & Friday: 10am - 1pm and 2pm - 4pm
• Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday: 2pm - 4pm

1-1 personal consultations can also be booked in advance for an hourly fee during the following times:

• Monday to Friday: 9am - 4pm

A subsequent post made today (Wednesday) states "A further statement about the changes to opening hours will be made tomorrow."

Such a charges regime will surely be damaging to the archive - who is going to pay £31.50 an hour to view its holdings? Clearly a MAJOR rethink is in order here.

A petition condeming the announcement and asking the archive to go home and think again is available at https://www.change.org/p/northamptonshire-county-council-northamptonshire-county-council-don-t-charge-for-visiting-archives - please do sign. If this sets a precedent, it will cause unlimited damage to the field of family history research, and I would venture, hit academic research hard also.

(With thanks to Vivienne Dunstan via Facebook)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Plant a Family Tree software released

I've received the following press release from Miavy Systems:

Miavy Systems has announced the launch of its online family tree builder - Plant a Family Tree (https://www.plantafamilytree.com)

Miavy Systems is the developer of the existing My Family Tree app for Mac OS, and is looking to expand their offerings of genealogical software with this web based online family tree builder.

The Plant a Family Tree builder is targeted towards users looking for a simple and fun editor which is not over-complicated by the in-depth record keeping features which are standard with other genealogical software.

The tool is ideal for beginner genealogists and parents looking to get their children involved in researching and building a beautiful family tree.

The online builder is available free of charge to all users.

Paid accounts are also available at $4.99 monthly for users who wish to store their family trees online to continue editing them later.


Company Bio

Miavy Systems
Founded: 2010
Developer of several apps for Mac OS including "My Family Tree"

Contact:
support@miavy.com
abdulqadir@miavy.com

(With thanks to Abdulqadir Rashik)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

The Bailie's Great Adventure in Elgin

From Moray and Nairn Family History Society:

Council Corruption

Documents have come to light, revealing council corruption on a grand scale: votes bought and sold; kidnapping; attacks on properties; and, mob rule.

Read all about it (free online) in a new publication from Moray & Nairn Family History Society on their website at http://www.morayandnairnfhs.co.uk/moray.asp, in The Bailie’s Great Adventure.

In the early part of the 19th century, general elections were very different to what we know today. In the town of Elgin, for example, there were only 17 voters. Little wonder then that
the greatest efforts were made to capture the votes of these people. 

This publication describes some of the events surrounding the general election called at the
death of King George III in 1820. It follows the life of one of the bailies of Elgin, Francis
Taylor, during the election period in March that year.

(With thanks to Doug Stewart)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Dundee cemeteries

In response to a previous post I had a query from a reader called Ravey Hites, which I accidentally deleted instead of publishing, so apologies Ravey!

The query was with regards to the existence of Dundee cemeteries - you'll find maps of the city's cemeteries at http://www.dundeecity.gov.uk/environment/cemeterymaps, and some burial transcriptions at http://www.fdca.org.uk/ and https://www.scottish-monumental-inscriptions.com/collections/angus-area.

Hope that helps!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

QUB's Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland website

Have you used the Ordnance Survey Memoirs for Irish research? They provide a great contextual backdrop to the parishes in the north of Ireland in early to mid 19th century Ireland.

Queens University Belfast previously had a great page detailing their contents, but this now seems to be dead - however, I have found it preserved on the Internet Archive at https://web.archive.org/web/20140403234906/http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/IrishStudiesGateway/Research/PastResearch/OrdnanceSurveyMemoirs/OrdnanceSurveyMemoirsbyCounty/.

They are a great resource - the volumes themselves can be purchased form the Ulster Historical Foundation at https://www.ancestryireland.com/latest-news/ordnance-survey-memoirs-now-available/.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.